Faith in Music

Recently, I met someone who made me attempt to listen to contemporary classical music. You know, Steve Reich, Elliott Carter, Arnold Schoenberg…Some of it I like, but most of it goes over my head.

Then I visited a blog I had neglected for a while, waggish, and ran across this post. David Auerbach, who is ‘waggish,’ quotes Charles Rosen, a pianist and author:

It is not at all natural to want to listen to classical music. Learning to appreciate it is like Pascal’s wager: you pretend to be religious, and suddenly you have faith. You pretend to love Beethoven–or Stravinsky–because you think that will make you appear educated and cultured and intelligent, because that kind of thing music is prestigious in professional circles, and suddenly you really love it, you have become a fanatic, you go to concerts and buy records and experience true ecstasy when you hear a good performance (or even when you hear a mediocre one if you have little judgment.)
Berlioz detested the music of Bach: he did not want to enjoy it. Stravinsky despised Brahms, but came around to him at the end of his life. Not all composers are easy to love: Beethoven was more difficult than Mozart, Stravinsky harder than Ravel. Some composers, on the other hand, bring diminishing dividends over the years to their amateurs. One can revive a taste for Hummel or Saint-Saens, but it is not nourishing over a long period. (A little Satie for me goes a long way: I am never in a hurry to return to him.) Those amateurs who love a composer are the only ones whose opinion counts; the negative votes have no importance. The musical canon is not decided by majority opinion but by enthusiasm and passion. A work that ten people love passionately is more important than one that ten thousand do not mind hearing.

Waggish has this under the entry Elitist Credo, but I think the more interesting aspect is the idea that if you just put all the negative opinions aside and listen to the music enough, it will eventually mean something to you. So we’ll see…

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